NCAR/UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery

The NCAR|UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery includes photos and illustrations of weather, water, climate, and solar phenomena. GET STARTED: In the SEARCH OPENSKY box above, enter words such as air pollution, clouds, floods, lightning, rainbows, tornadoes, or storms - to name just a few possibilities. The gallery also includes photos of scientists and engineers at work, research instruments and aircraft, field projects, landscapes, educational settings, supercomputers, NCAR|UCAR facilities, and more. Use this CREDIT for all images: Copyright University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). By [insert name of photographer when listed], licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) License, via OpenSky. (For commercial use contact copyright@ucar.edu.)


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32-node Connection Machine-5 (CM-5), 1993 (DI02081)
32-node Connection Machine-5 (CM-5), 1993 (DI02081)
A 32-node Connection Machine-5 (CM-5) from Thinking Machines Corporation arrived at NCAR on April 21, 1993. The CM-5 cost $1.47 million. Following the tradition of naming its supercomputers after peaks in the Colorado Rockies, SCD named the CM-5: specifically, the CM-5 control processor "littlebear." It became available for users to conduct parallel experiments later in the year and was used for turbulence modeling, ocean modeling, and climate simulations. The machine was decommissioned in October 1996.
50th anniversary reception at the Mesa Lab
50th anniversary reception at the Mesa Lab
50th anniversary reception at the Mesa Lab, Warren Washington,
A look inside bluefire (DI01809)
A look inside bluefire (DI01809)
Named "bluefire," this supercomputer has a peak speed of more than 76 teraflops (76 trillion floating-point operations per second). Manufactured by IBM, it is known as a Power 575 Hydro-Cluster and is the first in a highly energy-efficient class of machines. Increasingly fast machines such as this one are vital to research into such areas as climate change and the formation of hurricanes and other severe storms. Scientists at NCAR and across the country will use the system to accelerate research into climate change and to improve weather forecasting models.
A look inside bluefire (DI01810)
A look inside bluefire (DI01810)
Named "bluefire," this supercomputer has a peak speed of more than 76 teraflops (76 trillion floating-point operations per second). Manufactured by IBM, it is known as a Power 575 Hydro-Cluster and is the first in a highly energy-efficient class of machines. Increasingly fast machines such as this one are vital to research into such areas as climate change and the formation of hurricanes and other severe storms. Scientists at NCAR and across the country will use the system to accelerate research into climate change and to improve weather forecasting models,
A look inside the Yellowstone Supercomputer (DI02646), Photograph by Carlye Calvin
A look inside the Yellowstone Supercomputer (DI02646), Photograph by Carlye Calvin
Yellowstone will feature 74,592 parallel processors, each carrying out calculations simultaneously when the supercomputer is running at its peak.
A wet, snowy day  in Denver (DI02543)
A wet, snowy day in Denver (DI02543)
A mixture of snow and rain slows traffic in Denver, Colorado.
AMSTAR, NCAR's massive digital storage library (DI01807)
AMSTAR, NCAR's massive digital storage library (DI01807)
AMSTAR, NCAR's massive digital storage library, enables atmospheric scientists to conduct increasingly sophisticated computer studies by preserving and protecting valuable scientific data. The new system is based on the StorageTek SL8500 Modular Library from Sun Microsystems. The NCAR name for the system, AMSTAR, stands for Augmentation of the Mass Storage Tape Archive Resources.
AMSTAR, NCAR's massive digital storage library (DI01808)
AMSTAR, NCAR's massive digital storage library (DI01808)
AMSTAR, NCAR's massive digital storage library, enables atmospheric scientists to conduct increasingly sophisticated computer studies by preserving and protecting valuable scientific data. The new system is based on the StorageTek SL8500 Modular Library from Sun Microsystems. The NCAR name for the system, AMSTAR, stands for Augmentation of the Mass Storage Tape Archive Resources. This image shows robots inside AMSTAR that respond to commands to fetch and mount tape cartridges for reading and/or writing.
ASTER (DI01250)
ASTER (DI01250)
In 1990, a new set of automated instrument packages allowed sampling of heat, momentum, and chemical fluxes between the ground and atmosphere. The Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) facility helped university scientists to examine the atmosphere's lowest kilometer with far more precision than before.
Accelerated Arctic warming (DI01891) Illustration by Steve Deyo
Accelerated Arctic warming (DI01891) Illustration by Steve Deyo
Simulations by global climate models show that when sea ice is in rapid decline, the rate of predicted Arctic warming over land can more than triple. The image at left shows simulated autumn temperature trends during periods of rapid sea-ice loss, which can last for 5 to 10 years. The accelerated warming signal (ranging from red to dark red) reaches nearly 1,000 miles inland. In contrast, the image at right shows the comparatively milder but still substantial warming rates associated with rising amounts of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and moderate sea-ice retreat that is expected during the 21st century. Most other parts of the globe (in white) still experience warming, but at a lower rate of less than 1 degree Fahrenheit (0.5 Celsius) per decade. [
Acid Rain Damage (DI01203)
Acid Rain Damage (DI01203)
Acid rain damage to building taken during NAME, North American Monsoon Experiment, June 2004. Primary sources of industrial pollution include emissions from power plants, smelters, and refineries, which pour oxides of sulfur and nitrogen, and other gases, into the atmosphere. There they react with moist air to become sulfuric and nitric acids, resulting in the formation of acid rain.

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