NCAR/UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery

The NCAR|UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery includes photos and illustrations of weather, water, climate, and solar phenomena. GET STARTED: In the SEARCH OPENSKY box above, enter words such as air pollution, clouds, floods, lightning, rainbows, tornadoes, or storms - to name just a few possibilities. The gallery also includes photos of scientists and engineers at work, research instruments and aircraft, field projects, landscapes, educational settings, supercomputers, NCAR|UCAR facilities, and more. Use this CREDIT for all images: Copyright University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). By [insert name of photographer when listed], licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) License, via OpenSky. (For commercial use contact copyright@ucar.edu.)


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Ying-Hwa "Bill" Kuo (DI02354)
Ying-Hwa "Bill" Kuo (DI02354)
NCAR senior scientist Bill Kuo directs the program office for the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate, or COSMIC. This globe-spanning satellite network, launched in April 2006, will furnish round-the-clock weather data, monitor climate change, and improve space weather forecasts by using signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS). Kuo served as the U.S. project director for the Taiwan Area Mesoscale Experiment and is a recognized leader in the fields of mesoscale numerical modeling and data assimilation. For many years he was the lead developer of the MM5 weather model, used around the world. His scientific interests include mesoscale modeling, explosive marine cyclogenesis, mesoscale convective systems, heavy rainfall prediction, data assimilation, the use of GPS for meteorological research, and model initialization. Kuo divides his time between COSMIC and NCAR's Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division.
Yuan Sui
Yuan Sui
Yuan Sui
Yucca Plant, Mexico (DI01227),  Photo by David Gochis
Yucca Plant, Mexico (DI01227), Photo by David Gochis
Climate change will cause major changes in the distribution of plant life. Different kinds of plants need different kinds of climatic conditions. As global temperatures increase and global climate changes, researchers expect the plant zones found in the world today to shift away from the equator and toward the poles. This photo was taken during NAME, North American Monsoon Experiment, June 2004, near Mazatlan, Mexico.
Yucca Plant, White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (DI00816), Photo by Vanessa Carney
Yucca Plant, White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (DI00816), Photo by Vanessa Carney
The yucca plant is commonly found in the warm regions of North America and the West Indies. Thirty species of yucca plants are found and all have stiff leaves and are evergreen. Several types are widely cultivated for their ornamental appearance and attractive flowers. Because humans have used the roots of some species to make soap, western settlers called it soapweed.
Yucca Plant, White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (DI00817), Photo by Vanessa Carney
Yucca Plant, White Sands National Monument, New Mexico (DI00817), Photo by Vanessa Carney
The yucca plant is commonly found in the warm regions of North America and the West Indies. Thirty species of yucca plants are found and all have stiff leaves and are evergreen. Several types are widely cultivated for their ornamental appearance and attractive flowers. Because humans have used the roots of some species to make soap, western settlers called it soapweed.
Yucca blossoms (DI01790)
Yucca blossoms (DI01790)
This image shows yucca blossoms near the Walter Orr Roberts Weather Trail near NCAR's Mesa Lab in Boulder, Colorado. The genus Yucca is a group of flowering plants native to the New World. It includes about 40 species, most of which occur in the southwestern United States and Mexico.

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