NCAR/UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery

The NCAR|UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery includes photos and illustrations of weather, water, climate, and solar phenomena. GET STARTED: In the SEARCH OPENSKY box above, enter words such as air pollution, clouds, floods, lightning, rainbows, tornadoes, or storms - to name just a few possibilities. The gallery also includes photos of scientists and engineers at work, research instruments and aircraft, field projects, landscapes, educational settings, supercomputers, NCAR|UCAR facilities, and more. Use this CREDIT for all images: Copyright University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). By [insert name of photographer when listed], licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) License, via OpenSky. (For commercial use contact copyright@ucar.edu.)


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Aerial view of the Atacama Desert, Chile (DI01827)
Aerial view of the Atacama Desert, Chile (DI01827)
The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is considered the driest desert in the world. NCAR scientists traveled to Chile as part of the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud Atmosphere-Land Study) field project in October 2008. VOCALS is an international field experiment designed to better understand physical and chemical processes central to the climate system of the Southeast Pacific region.
Aerial view of the Mesa Laboratory (DI01756)
Aerial view of the Mesa Laboratory (DI01756)
Viewed from the air, the Mesa Laboratory headquarters of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and its extensive horseshoe-shaped parking area stand firmly astride their mesa-top site of more than 400 acres (160 hectares) at the southwestern edge of Boulder, Colorado. The Mesa Laboratory is recognized as one of the major works of architect I.M. Pei. Completed in 1966, the laboratory strikes many viewers as futuristic, but its design was strongly influenced by the ancient Indian cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. With walls of reinforced concrete colored by locally quarried stone, the building harmonizes rather than competes with its dramatic setting. The laboratory's pristine mesa-top setting is maintained as a nature preserve.
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory (DI01730)
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory (DI01730)
Viewed from the air, the Mesa Laboratory headquarters of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and its extensive horseshoe-shaped parking area stand firmly astride their mesa-top site of more than 400 acres (160 hectares) at the southwestern edge of Boulder, Colorado. The Mesa Laboratory is recognized as one of the major works of architect I.M. Pei. Completed in 1966, the laboratory strikes many viewers as futuristic, but its design was strongly influenced by the ancient Indian cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. With walls of reinforced concrete colored by locally quarried stone, the building harmonizes rather than competes with its dramatic setting. The laboratory's pristine mesa-top setting is maintained as a nature preserve.
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory (DI01731)
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory (DI01731)
Viewed from the air, the Mesa Laboratory headquarters of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and its extensive horseshoe-shaped parking area stand firmly astride their mesa-top site of more than 400 acres (160 hectares) at the southwestern edge of Boulder, Colorado. The Mesa Laboratory is recognized as one of the major works of architect I.M. Pei. Completed in 1966, the laboratory strikes many viewers as futuristic, but its design was strongly influenced by the ancient Indian cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. With walls of reinforced concrete colored by locally quarried stone, the building harmonizes rather than competes with its dramatic setting. The laboratory's pristine mesa-top setting is maintained as a nature preserve.
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory (DI01732)
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory (DI01732)
Viewed from the air, the Mesa Laboratory headquarters of the National Center for Atmospheric Research stands firmly astride its mesa-top site of more than 400 acres (160 hectares) at the southwestern edge of Boulder, Colorado. The Mesa Laboratory is recognized as one of the major works of architect I.M. Pei. Completed in 1966, the laboratory strikes many viewers as futuristic, but its design was strongly influenced by the ancient Indian cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. With walls of reinforced concrete colored by locally quarried stone, the building harmonizes rather than competes with its dramatic setting. The laboratory's pristine mesa-top setting is maintained as a nature preserve.
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory building site (DI01745)
Aerial view of the NCAR Mesa Laboratory building site (DI01745)
The building site of the Mesa Laboratory headquarters of the National Center for Atmospheric Research comprises more than 400 acres (160 hectares) at the southwestern edge of Boulder, Colorado. The laboratory was completed in 1966.
Aerial view of the walnut orchard studied in the CHATS field project (DI01675)
Aerial view of the walnut orchard studied in the CHATS field project (DI01675)
CHATS, the Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study, measured winds and turbulence within and above a walnut orchard that functioned as a uniformly vegetated canopy. The broad goal was to improve modeling of surface-atmosphere exchange in regional and global land, atmosphere, and chemical models. This is an aerial view of the walnut orchard studied in the project with one of the equipment towers rising above the canopy.
Aerial, NWSC
Aerial, NWSC
Aerial, NWSC, NCAR Wyoming Supercomputing Center, Supercomputers,
African people (DI00058), Photo by Patrick Zimmerman
African people (DI00058), Photo by Patrick Zimmerman
The indigenous people of Africa have had to deal with changes in their way of life due to population expansion, and intensification of deforestation and land clearing, which resulted in climate changes. The Sahara Desert is expanding, invading vegetation plots, and silt in rivers is increasing, leading to flooding in regions where there are no trees to slow run-off.
Air Pollution over Boulder, Colorado (DI00394)
Air Pollution over Boulder, Colorado (DI00394)
The pollution-laden brown cloud long associated with Denver, Colorado, can also appear in the smaller city of Boulder (as seen here). In older industrial cities, such as London and New York, pollution traditionally arose from large-scale burning of coal and fuel oil that released tons of ashes, soot, and sulfur compounds. More recently--especially in lower-latitude cities such as Los Angeles and Denver--automobiles have been a primary culprit for pollution and smog. Nitric oxide from automobile exhaust combines with oxygen in the air to form the brown gas nitrogen dioxide. Also, when hydrocarbons and nitrous oxides from auto emissions are exposed to sunlight, a photochemical reaction helps lead to ozone and other irritating compounds. Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, universities, and state agencies have investigated both the chemical composition of the Denver area's brown cloud and its daily movements.
Air Pollution over Boulder, Colorado (DI00398)
Air Pollution over Boulder, Colorado (DI00398)
The pollution-laden brown cloud long associated with Denver, Colorado, can also appear in the smaller city of Boulder (as seen here). In older industrial cities, such as London and New York, pollution traditionally arose from large-scale burning of coal and fuel oil that released tons of ashes, soot, and sulfur compounds. More recently--especially in lower-latitude cities such as Los Angeles and Denver--automobiles have been a primary culprit for pollution and smog. Nitric oxide from automobile exhaust combines with oxygen in the air to form the brown gas nitrogen dioxide. Also, when hydrocarbons and nitrous oxides from auto emissions are exposed to sunlight, a photochemical reaction helps lead to ozone and other irritating compounds. Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, universities, and state agencies have investigated both the chemical composition of the Denver area's brown cloud and its daily movements.
Air pollution over Boulder, Colorado (DI00391)
Air pollution over Boulder, Colorado (DI00391)
The pollution-laden brown cloud long associated with Denver, Colorado, can also appear in the smaller city of Boulder (as seen here). In older industrial cities, such as London and New York, pollution traditionally arose from large-scale burning of coal and fuel oil that released tons of ashes, soot, and sulfur compounds. More recently--especially in lower-latitude cities such as Los Angeles and Denver--automobiles have been a primary culprit for pollution and smog. Nitric oxide from automobile exhaust combines with oxygen in the air to form the brown gas nitrogen dioxide. Also, when hydrocarbons and nitrous oxides from auto emissions are exposed to sunlight, a photochemical reaction helps lead to ozone and other irritating compounds. Scientists from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, universities, and state agencies have investigated both the chemical composition of the Denver area's brown cloud and its daily movements.

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