NCAR/UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery

The NCAR|UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery includes photos and illustrations of weather, water, climate, and solar phenomena. GET STARTED: In the SEARCH OPENSKY box above, enter words such as air pollution, clouds, floods, lightning, rainbows, tornadoes, or storms - to name just a few possibilities. The gallery also includes photos of scientists and engineers at work, research instruments and aircraft, field projects, landscapes, educational settings, supercomputers, NCAR|UCAR facilities, and more. Use this CREDIT for all images: Copyright University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). By [insert name of photographer when listed], licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) License, via OpenSky. (For commercial use contact copyright@ucar.edu.)


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Anemometer (DI01143)
Anemometer (DI01143)
Close-up of an anemometer deployed in BAMEX (the Bow Echo and MCV Experiment).
Angled shot of the Yellowstone Supercomputer (DI02647), Photograph by Carlye Calvin
Angled shot of the Yellowstone Supercomputer (DI02647), Photograph by Carlye Calvin
"We are delighted that Yellowstone is here," says UCAR president Tom Bogdan. "This supercomputer and the NWSC as a whole will provide a long-sought and much-needed boost to the capabilities of researchers in the atmospheric and Earth sciences."
Antactic temperature trends (DI01886) Illustration by Steve Deyo
Antactic temperature trends (DI01886) Illustration by Steve Deyo
This map of Antarctica shows the approximate boundaries of areas that have warmed or cooled over the past 35 years. The map is based on a data set constructed by NCAR scientist Andrew Monaghan and colleagues and used to publish findings in 2008 about Antarctic temperature trends. The data combines observations from ground-based weather stations, which are few and far between, with analysis of ice cores used to reveal past temperatures.
Antarctica (DI00195), Photo by Charles Smythe
Antarctica (DI00195), Photo by Charles Smythe
Antarctica's climate is characterized by low temperature, high wind velocities, and frequent blizzards. Rapidly changing weather is typical of coastal locations, where temperatures for the warmest month average around freezing. High altitude and continuous winter darkness make the interior of Antarctica the coldest place on earth.
Anthes Building break area (DI02534)
Anthes Building break area (DI02534)
Second-floor break area in the Anthes building.
Anthes building (DI02460)
Anthes building (DI02460)
The Anthes building before being remodeled. The Anthes Building (FL-A) at 3375 Mitchell Lane in northeast Boulder was purchased by UCAR in 2009 and remodeled in 2011. It was named for Richard Anthes, UCAR president from 1988 to the present and NCAR director from 1986 to 1988. It features energy-efficient, green components, resulting in long-term cost savings. Among these components is a geothermal heating and cooling exchange system. Geothermal systems draw on the relatively constant temperature of the ground below a building (roughly 50 degrees F in the Boulder area) in order to generate heating in winter and cooling in summer, producing as much as six times more power than they consume. The building is the future home of NCAR's Research Applications Laboratory (RAL).
Anthes building (DI02473)
Anthes building (DI02473)
The Anthes Building (FL-A) at 3375 Mitchell Lane in northeast Boulder was purchased by UCAR in 2009 and remodeled in 2011. It is named for Richard Anthes, UCAR president from 1988 to the present and NCAR director from 1986 to 1988. It features energy-efficient, green components, resulting in long-term cost savings. Among these components is a geothermal heating and cooling exchange system and solar panels on the roof. Geothermal systems draw on the relatively constant temperature of the ground below a building (roughly 50 degrees F in the Boulder area) in order to generate heating in winter and cooling in summer, producing as much as six times more power than they consume. The 100-kilowatt array of solar panels on the roof is capable of producing about 37% of the building's electricity needs and 24% of the building's total energy needs. The building is the future home of NCAR's Research Applications Laboratory (RAL).
Anthes building (DI02474)
Anthes building (DI02474)
The Anthes Building (FL-A) at 3375 Mitchell Lane in northeast Boulder was purchased by UCAR in 2009 and remodeled in 2011. It is named for Richard Anthes, UCAR president from 1988 to the present and NCAR director from 1986 to 1988. It features energy-efficient, green components, resulting in long-term cost savings. Among these components is a geothermal heating and cooling exchange system and solar panels on the roof. Geothermal systems draw on the relatively constant temperature of the ground below a building (roughly 50 degrees F in the Boulder area) in order to generate heating in winter and cooling in summer, producing as much as six times more power than they consume. The 100-kilowatt array of solar panels on the roof is capable of producing about 37% of the building's electricity needs and 24% of the building's total energy needs. The building is the future home of NCAR's Research Applications Laboratory (RAL).
Anthes building (DI02475)
Anthes building (DI02475)
The Anthes Building (FL-A) at 3375 Mitchell Lane in northeast Boulder was purchased by UCAR in 2009 and remodeled in 2011. It is named for Richard Anthes, UCAR president from 1988 to the present and NCAR director from 1986 to 1988. It features energy-efficient, green components, resulting in long-term cost savings. Among these components is a geothermal heating and cooling exchange system and solar panels on the roof. Geothermal systems draw on the relatively constant temperature of the ground below a building (roughly 50 degrees F in the Boulder area) in order to generate heating in winter and cooling in summer, producing as much as six times more power than they consume. The 100-kilowatt array of solar panels on the roof is capable of producing about 37% of the building's electricity needs and 24% of the building's total energy needs. The building is the future home of NCAR's Research Applications Laboratory (RAL).
Anthes building (DI02476)
Anthes building (DI02476)
The Anthes Building (FL-A) at 3375 Mitchell Lane in northeast Boulder was purchased by UCAR in 2009 and remodeled in 2011. It is named for Richard Anthes, UCAR president from 1988 to the present and NCAR director from 1986 to 1988. It features energy-efficient, green components, resulting in long-term cost savings. Among these components is a geothermal heating and cooling exchange system and solar panels on the roof. Geothermal systems draw on the relatively constant temperature of the ground below a building (roughly 50 degrees F in the Boulder area) in order to generate heating in winter and cooling in summer, producing as much as six times more power than they consume. The 100-kilowatt array of solar panels on the roof is capable of producing about 37% of the building's electricity needs and 24% of the building's total energy needs. The building is the future home of NCAR's Research Applications Laboratory (RAL).
Anticrepuscular rays (DI01610), Photo by Carlye Calvin
Anticrepuscular rays (DI01610), Photo by Carlye Calvin
Anticrepuscular rays are similar to crepuscular rays, but seen opposite the sun in the sky. Anticrepuscular rays are most frequently visible near sunrise or sunset. Crepuscular rays are usually much brighter than anticrepuscular rays.
Anticrepuscular rays (DI01626), Photo by Carlye Calvin
Anticrepuscular rays (DI01626), Photo by Carlye Calvin
Anticrepuscular rays are similar to crepuscular rays, but seen opposite the sun in the sky. Anticrepuscular rays are most frequently visible near sunrise or sunset. These anticrepuscular rays were seen at sunset in Boulder, Colorado. Crepuscular rays are usually much brighter than anticrepuscular rays.

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