NCAR/UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery

The NCAR|UCAR Image and Multimedia Gallery includes photos and illustrations of weather, water, climate, and solar phenomena. GET STARTED: In the SEARCH OPENSKY box above, enter words such as air pollution, clouds, floods, lightning, rainbows, tornadoes, or storms - to name just a few possibilities. The gallery also includes photos of scientists and engineers at work, research instruments and aircraft, field projects, landscapes, educational settings, supercomputers, NCAR|UCAR facilities, and more. Use this CREDIT for all images: Copyright University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). By [insert name of photographer when listed], licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) License, via OpenSky. (For commercial use contact copyright@ucar.edu.)


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Anticrepuscular rays (DI01626), Photo by Carlye Calvin
Anticrepuscular rays (DI01626), Photo by Carlye Calvin
Anticrepuscular rays are similar to crepuscular rays, but seen opposite the sun in the sky. Anticrepuscular rays are most frequently visible near sunrise or sunset. These anticrepuscular rays were seen at sunset in Boulder, Colorado. Crepuscular rays are usually much brighter than anticrepuscular rays.
Anvil cloud (DI02707), Photograph by Greg Thompson
Anvil cloud (DI02707), Photograph by Greg Thompson
An Anvil Cloud is a cloud which has reached the level of stratospheric stability and has formed the characteristic flat, anvil-top shape.
Anvil cloud (DI02708), Photograph by Greg Thompson
Anvil cloud (DI02708), Photograph by Greg Thompson
An Anvil Cloud is a cloud which has reached the level of stratospheric stability and has formed the characteristic flat, anvil-top shape.
Architect I.M. Pei inspects test slabs, 1965 (DI02092)
Architect I.M. Pei inspects test slabs, 1965 (DI02092)
In 1965 Mesa Lab architect I.M. Pei visited the site to inspect test slabs for the exterior of the building. The unique look of the lab's exterior is a result of "bush hammering" the poured-concrete surfaces. The mesa-top building is the headquarters of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and is recognized as one of Pei's major works. Completed in 1966, the laboratory strikes many viewers as futuristic, but its design was strongly influenced by the ancient Indian cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado.
Arctic September sea ice extent (DI01898) Illustration by Steve Deyo
Arctic September sea ice extent (DI01898) Illustration by Steve Deyo
This figure illustrates the extent to which Arctic sea ice, through 2006, melted faster than projected by computer models. The dotted line represents the average rate of melting indicated by computer models, with the blue area indicating the spread among the different models (shown as plus/minus one standard deviation). The red line shows the actual rate of Arctic ice loss based on observations. The observations have been particularly accurate since 1979 because of new satellite technology. (Illustration by Steve Deyo based on research by NSIDC and NCAR)
Arctic scene (DI00188), Photo by James Hannigan
Arctic scene (DI00188), Photo by James Hannigan
A view northwest from North Mountain over Wolstenholm Fjord, north of Thule, Greenland, is captured from the National Science Foundation/National Center for Atmospheric Research C-130 aircraft during the Tropospheric Ozone Production about the Spring Equinox (TOPSE) experiment. The goal of TOPSE was to investigate the chemical and dynamic evolution of tropospheric chemical composition over mid- to high-latitude continental North America during the winter/spring transition, with particular emphasis on the springtime ozone maximum in the troposphere.
Arctic sea ice on the Chukchi Sea (DI01967)
Arctic sea ice on the Chukchi Sea (DI01967)
Sea ice on the Chukchi Sea near Barrow, Alaska. This image was taken during the OASIS (Ocean_Atmosphere_Sea Ice_Snowpack) field project. Part of International Polar Year, OASIS tackled a number of standing questions in polar chemistry, with the emphasis on the life cycle of pollutants that drift into the Arctic.
Arctic sea ice on the Chukchi Sea (DI01973)
Arctic sea ice on the Chukchi Sea (DI01973)
Sea ice on the Chukchi Sea near Barrow, Alaska. This image was taken during the OASIS (Ocean_Atmosphere_Sea Ice_Snowpack) field project. Part of International Polar Year, OASIS tackled a number of standing questions in polar chemistry, with the emphasis on the life cycle of pollutants that drift into the Arctic.
Arctic sea ice summer minimum, 2000 (DI01902)
Arctic sea ice summer minimum, 2000 (DI01902)
This image, based on simulations produced by the NCAR-based Community Climate System Model, shows the approximate extent of Arctic sea ice in September 2000. The model indicates the extent of this late-summer ice could begin to retreat abruptly within several decades.
Arctic sea ice summer minimum, 2040 (DI01903)
Arctic sea ice summer minimum, 2040 (DI01903)
This image, based on simulations produced by the NCAR-based Community Climate System Model, shows the possible extent of Arctic sea ice by 2040. The model indicates that the extent of late-summer ice could begin to retreat abruptly within several decades.

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