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US CLIVAR Reports

US Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) is a national research program with a mission to foster understanding of the ocean's role in the climate system. Coordinating and progressing research on outstanding climate questions, this collection of reports and white papers have been headed by US CLIVAR and supported by programs within five federal agencies which include: the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Office of Naval Research (ONR).


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U.S. CLIVAR Atlantic Implementation Plan
This document describes what the U.S. CLIVAR Scientific Steering Committeee hoped to achieve between 2000 and 2010 in observing and understanding the phenomena of climate variability in and around the Atlantic basin in support of Atlantic CLIVAR programs; it sets out a prioritized and integrated plan for sustained observations, and modeling and theoretical investigations of the atmosphere-ocean-land coupled system., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. CLIVAR ENSO Diversity Workshop Report
Understanding of ENSO diversity is still limited, and the existence of specific “precursors” to the different flavors is unclear. This
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 2012 ENSO Diversity Workshop., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. CLIVAR Hurricane Workshop Report
The report summarizes the June 2013 workshop on the analyses of climate model experiments coordinated by the U.S. CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group to improve understanding of interannual variability and trends in tropical cyclone activity from the beginning of the 20th century to present and to quantify changes in the characteristics of tropical cyclones in a warming climate. , The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. CLIVAR Pacific Implementation Plan
The U.S. CLIVAR Pacific program has as its core the Pacific Basin Extended Climate Study (PBECS). PBECS is a basin-wide study of interannual-to-decadal climate variability in and over the Pacific Ocean. This document summarizes management and outreach strategies, as well as a scientific plan that can attract modelers, analysts, and data gatherers to work with CLIVAR and the Pacific Basin Extended Climate Study. This implementation plan lays out the main elements of PBECS as defined in a series of community planning meetings, and also points to areas where additional planning is needed to complete PBECS., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. CLIVAR Pan-American Implementation Plan
This document summarizes a prioritzed plan for the U.S. CLIVAR Pan-American Climate Studies Program that encompasses a broad range of activities that include empirical and modeling studies, as well as the development and analysis of historical datasets to arrive at a better understanding and simulation of the phenomena that control the seasonal rainfall patterns and their variability on seasonal-to-decadal timescales., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. CLIVAR Position Paper, International CLIVAR Conference, UNESCO, Paris, December 2-4, 1998
This document highlights the U.S. CLIVAR position as it will contribute to the International CLIVAR mission with research in these specific areas: global seasonal-to-interannual predictability, decadal modulation of ENSO, Atlantic climate variability, anthropogenic climate change, African climate variability, Southern Ocean thermohaline circulation, climate modeling, sustained observations of climate and atmospheric and oceanic changes, and dataset development., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. CLIVAR Science Plan
The U.S. CLIVAR Science Plan is intended to guide the program over the next 15 years by: 1) updating the goals and priorities of U.S. CLIVAR based on achievements to date; 2) articulating the expansion of core research to target specific research challenges; 3) emphasizing strengthened ties to the broader Earth sciences community and relevance to societal impacts; 4) bolstering research funding commitments by U.S. agencies to achieve their mission objectives; and 5) articulating the envisioned collaborations with other U.S. and international research programs., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. CLIVAR Scientific Steering Committee Report of the Tenth Meeting (SSC-10)
This report summarizes presentations and discussion during the U.S. CLIVAR tenth meeting., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
U.S. Repeat Hydrography/CO2 Tracer Program (GO-SHIP): Accomplishments From the First Decadal Survey
The U.S. Repeat Hydrography CO2/Tracer Program, having recently completed a decade of full-depth surveys of the world’s ocean basins, has compiled a report summarizing programmatic and scientific achievements. As a contributor to the international Global Ocean Ship-based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP), the U.S. program has advanced understanding of the role of the ocean in climate change, carbon cycling, and biogeochemical responses. The report highlights key scientific discoveries and presents future science and monitoring objectives., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
Understanding the Dynamic Response of Greenland's Marine Terminating Glaciers to Oceanic and Atmospheric Forcing: A White Paper
The U.S. CLIVAR GRISO Working Group concludes that ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions in Greenland represent a new research frontier that is critical to understanding glacier evolution and ice sheet mass balance. Recent observed changes in Greenland show that these processes are important in the context of decadal-to-centennial climate variability. A synthesis of the science and a detailed set of recommendations are provided in this white paper., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.
Workshop on Analyses, Dynamics, and Modeling of Large-scale Meteorological Patterns Associated with Extreme Temperature and Precipitation Events
The report synthesizes the findings and discussion of a June 2013 workshop to explore data issues, statistical and dynamical methods, and modeling approaches to enable improved analysis and simulation of short-term (5 days or less) extreme events in North America. It also presents a set of recommendations to accelerate progress in this important field of research., The U.S. CLIVAR Project Office produced this report with support from NASA, NOAA, NSF, and DOE. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the sponsoring agencies.

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